Antique of the week

These CLOCKS were specially made for barber shops by Waterbury Clock Company.  The hands would move counter-clockwise so the barber or customer can tell time while looking in the mirror.

 

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Published in: on December 2, 2010 at 23:09  Leave a Comment  

Antique of the week

Various kinds of BARBER BOTTLES lined the back bar’s of shops then.  They would be filled with different hair tonics, lotions, aftershaves, and fragrances. These one’s here in particular are known as the HOBNAIL barber bottle.  Hand blown GLASS with the distinct bumps surrounding outside….  “Hmmm… A little hair tonic for you will do.”

 

Published in: on November 23, 2010 at 00:14  Leave a Comment  

Antique of the week

These barber shop TOWEL STEAMERS/STERILIZERS were common during the early 1900’s.  “The Sun”, shown here,  would keep towels hot for the barber to prep customers beards prior to shaving.  Also, these steamers would be a source of hot water for the barbers to mix soap lather in their mugs.  A combination of HOT TOWELS and HOT LATHER is best for close shave.

 

Published in: on November 8, 2010 at 01:51  Leave a Comment  

Antique of the week

Back in the early 1900’s, shop STERILIZATION was huge and still is in it’s own way today.  Barbers would keep their razors, combs, scissors and such in these BACKBAR STERILIZER’s.  This one here is made by Erie City Manufacturing dating back to around 1910.

 

Published in: on November 3, 2010 at 12:58  Leave a Comment  

The solution to all worries ;)

Published in: on October 26, 2010 at 01:29  Leave a Comment  

Antique of the week

These cash registers were seen in shops back in the day… Made by National in the early 1900’s.  Brass finish with that distinct ring every time it opened..  CHAA CHIINNNGG!!

 

Published in: on October 24, 2010 at 00:16  Leave a Comment  

Antique of the week

The barber pole was used to indicate tonsorial arts was performed in the establishment.  It originated because tonsors would not only do shaves and cut hair, but they would also do minor surgery and dental work.  The bandages used on the people would be hung outside to dry.  With the wind blowing around, they would twist together thus making a bloody spiral effect.  With that, people would recognize where the tonsorial parlour  was.  Eventually, surgery and dentistry was phased out of tonsorial arts so instead they painted a pole with red for blood and white for the bandage.  The blue stripe we see on poles today came much later to indicate blood inside the body.  To this day, barber poles are still the symbol of a barber shop.

 

Published in: on October 14, 2010 at 23:42  Leave a Comment  

Antique of the week

Back then, men would visit the barber quite frequently to get a HOT LATHER SHAVE.  They would have their very own PERSONALIZED SHAVE MUG and BRUSH at the shop for them.  It was believed to be more sanitary.  Indirectly, this would show the clients which barber was the busiest because of how many mugs they had on a rack beside their chair.  To have your name on the wall was special for both client and barber.  I guess it was a pride thing…

Published in: on September 24, 2010 at 02:03  Leave a Comment  

Antique of the week

Barbers would get the “SEVEN-DAY SET” so they can rotate razors thru out the week.  It was a way to identify them and also to keep them well maintained so they stay RAZOR SHAP.

Published in: on September 16, 2010 at 02:50  Comments (1)  

Antique of the week

Old barber chairs are hands down THE BEST.  This one here is a KOKEN dating back to the early 1900’s.  It may have been customized in some way with the red porcelain and some gold trimming because I haven’t seen this before.  Great style and built to last.

Published in: on September 9, 2010 at 21:36  Leave a Comment